Tag: News

To contain the nuclear crisis: the European Union foreign minister visits Iran
Middle East & Africa

To contain the nuclear crisis: the European Union foreign minister visits Iran

By Amina Souafi.

European Union Foreign Minister Josep Borrell arrived in the Iranian capital, Tehran, according to what Iranian Foreign Ministry spokesman Abbas Mousavi announced, in light of renewed tension between the West and Tehran over its nuclear file.

Moussaoui said in a press statement that Borrell “will arrive in Iran for the first time since he took office (early December). Foreign Minister Muhammad Javad Zarif is scheduled to meet with other prominent officials in our country for consultations.”

Moussaoui did not provide further details about Borel’s arrival time or the duration of his visit.

This visit comes amid new tension between Iran and Western countries, against the background of the Islamic Republic’s nuclear program.

On January 24, Borrell invited the signatories of the 2015 nuclear agreement in Vienna to a meeting in February, in order to preserve the agreement that has been at risk of collapse since the United States unilaterally withdrew from it in 2018.

He stated at the time that all parties “confirmed their determination to preserve the agreement that is in everyone’s interest.”

In Vienna, Iran agreed to limit its nuclear program in exchange for a partial lifting of international sanctions that stifle its economy.

But the U.S. exit from the agreement, and its reimposition of sanctions against Iran since 2018, deprived Tehran of the economic benefits it had been awaiting from the agreement.

With sanctions re-imposed, in May 2019, an economy in recession, Iran declared its non-compliance with the restrictions agreed in Vienna.

In an attempt to force Tehran to return to compliance with the terms of the agreement, the Europeans launched a mechanism in January to resolve the dispute.

In a related context, a Japanese destroyer sailed to the Gulf of Oman, amid increasing tension in the Middle East, in order to protect the shipping lines that supply the third largest economy in the world with almost all of their oil needs.

“Thousands of Japanese ships sail in these waters every year, including ships carrying nine-tenths of our oil. They are the lifeblood of Japan,” Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe told the crew of the destroyer Takanami, at the Yokosuka naval base near Tokyo, before sailing.

The ship, which will be escorted by two maritime patrol aircraft, will not join a U.S.-led naval force or any other naval alliances in the region.

Japan opted to act independently in the region’s conflicts. The Tokyo government has friendly relations with Iran and other Middle Eastern countries, and Abe traveled to the region in January to brief Saudi Arabia, the United Arab Emirates and Oman on the mission after having held talks with Iranian leaders.

Tension has increased in the Middle East since the rift between Iran and the United States intensified following the decision of US President Donald Trump to withdraw from the international nuclear agreement that Tehran concluded with world powers in 2015, and the subsequent re-imposition of US sanctions on Iran.To read all the latest news on africa.

The European Union is awaiting a new negotiation battle with Britain after Brexit
Europe

The European Union is awaiting a new negotiation battle with Britain after Brexit

By Amina Souafi.

On Monday began, the first phase of a diplomatic battle between Britain and the European Union, following the first formal departure from it, last Friday, after a 47-year membership, to regulate the form of their relationship after Brexit.

It is expected that the negotiations over the “red Tapes” of their future relationship, which is not yet determined, will witness great tension, amid British intransigence towards the conditions of the union.

And the two parties must agree on the new foundations of these relations, especially in the commercial aspect, the solid core of the talks. From the start, the two sides expressed very firm positions.

According to the excerpts of the speech, “There is no need for a free exchange agreement that includes accepting the rules of the European Union in the field of competition, aid, social security, the environment and other subjects.”

On Sunday, the European Union’s chief negotiator, Michel Barnier, imposed two conditions for a trade agreement, “an agreement on common rules” so that London does not turn into a competitor, and a settlement on the issue of ultra-sensitive fishing.

To make matters more difficult, these negotiations will take place at a very rapid pace because Johnson refuses to extend the transition period in which the British will continue to apply European rules, which are supposed to extend for three years.

However, negotiations are supposed to take place during this period, which ends on December 31.

Today, Michel Barnier will unveil the terms of negotiation and define the priorities and redlines of the European Union.

Barnier knows the details of the file because he had previously negotiated the Brexit Agreement on ways to get Britain out of the Union for more than two years.

Member states will endorse their negotiating mission at the end of February, because negotiations will not officially begin until early next March.

The negotiations will mainly deal with economic partnership, especially the free trade agreement, security issues and planned judicial measures to resolve disputes.

For Europeans, access to the European single market, which includes about 440 million consumers, will be conditional on respecting health, environmental, social and tax standards, as well as standards to respect state aid to companies.

And this market is very important for London because the European Union remains its first trading partner.

The Europeans want to conduct negotiations in parallel on all issues in order to reduce the risk of divisions that could benefit the British.

One of the most sensitive issues during the negotiation process will be the fishing file that the two sides promised to reach agreement on before July 1st.

Fishermen from several member countries, such as France and Denmark, depend on British waters, which also account for 30% of the work of French fishermen.

Johnson, for his part, stressed that “regaining control” of this fishing waters is of great importance and promised “a wonderful new national fishing policy.”

Hunting could be a barter currency during these talks, for example for British financial services, which are so essential to London’s financial district, to reach the continent.

Paris warned that France would “be very vigilant” on the issue.

A first outcome of the talks will be published at the end of June, which could allow an assessment of the risks of “failure to reach agreement”, a specter still haunting the talks, raising fears of catastrophic consequences.Read more news from europe.

Libyan Parliament: These are our conditions for participating in the Geneva Dialogue
Geopolitics

Libyan Parliament: These are our conditions for participating in the Geneva Dialogue

By Amina Souafi.

In conjunction with the holding of meetings of the Libyan Dialogue Committee in Geneva under the auspices of the UN envoy, Ghassan Salameh, the Libyan parliament listed a number of conditions that must be met for its participation in the Geneva meeting.

He also stressed that his representatives in the Geneva Dialogue are chosen by him and under the dome of Parliament, stressing the need to clearly define the tasks of the Dialogue Committees, the duration of time and the mechanisms of their work.

In addition, the Libyan parliament demanded that no government will be approved unless approved by it and that the number of its representatives will not be equal to the number of representatives of the advisory council.

This position came hours after the UN envoy announced that “there is a real will to start negotiations” between the two warring parties with their intention to meet for talks in Geneva with the aim of achieving a permanent ceasefire in the country.

Salama also said in a press conference from Geneva today that he asked the Security Council to pass a resolution reaffirming the existing arms embargo and agreeing to measures to ensure adherence to it.

He explained that the talks between the two parties, which did not meet face-to-face in Geneva on Monday, aimed to “bridge gaps in views on how to organize a sustainable, permanent ceasefire on the ground.” He added, “We started yesterday to discuss a long list of points on our agenda, ranging from working to transform the armistice to a more coherent one and reduce the violations of the parties to it, as well as turning that armistice into a real agreement on a permanent ceasefire.”

The Geneva talks include five senior soldiers from the Libyan National Army and five forces allied to the reconciliation government.

It is noteworthy that the fighting on the ground continued recently despite the call for a truce launched by Russia and Turkey starting from January 12 and an international summit on Libya held in Berlin on January 19 with the aim of curbing international intervention. watch more news about Geopolitics news and updates.

                    Sitemap
Twitter Feed

A college senior student, Ashley Lawrence has been thoughtful to design masks which have a plastic strip on the mouth part that will help the deaf and dumb community to continue to use sign language to communicate.
#ProtectiveMasks #DeafandDumb #NewsAlert #Corona

Load More...